Explore The Park

 

 
Here at Fort Knox Park, on the eastern bank of the Bronx River, visitors have views of the lovely stone arch bridge near the ruins of the historic Tapestry Works. This was one of 12 mills located along the river during the 18th century. We are trying to discover if the pier in the middle of the river was used to support an old footbridge. Do you know?
Fort Knox Park is divided by the Bronx River into east and west sections. The east side (foreground) has a fairly level open space next to the banks of the Bronx River. This area is often used for soccer and other active recreation games even though it is too small for regulation size fields.
These pathways under the arches of the stone and concrete bridges in Fort Knox Park are very picturesque, but some visitors feel these are unsafe places, particularly at night. What do you think?
The western bank of Fort Knox Park has a fairly level and wide area which has been used by remote control car enthusiasts as a race track. This area, like many along the river, is prone to seasonal flooding.
Views at the southern end of Shoelace Park (near 211th Street) are defined by an allee (double row) of oaks which were planted as part of the original Bronx River Parkway. The historic roadbed remains today and is used as a pedestrian and bike path, part of the Bronx River Greenway trail.
The river's edge has become home to number of invasive plant species. There have been successive plant removal and restoration efforts along the river, but more work is needed to restore and establish native plants. The pathway and benches provide access to the river banks, but the paths can get very muddy.
Olinville Playground (and restrooms) experience seasonal flooding due to the floodplain location and have to be closed when this happens. The neighborhood children love the swing sets! There are also basketball courts for older children and adults.
The Bocce Courts near East 224th Street were reconstructed in 1982. Bocce is an ancient game similar to bowling. It is often played by older adults, but can be played by people of all ages. Have you ever played bocce?
Niles Triangle between 225th and 226th Streets is named for William White Niles (1861-1935). Mr. Niles played an important role in the creation of parks throughout the Bronx as well as this park along the Bronx River Parkway. The paved space is surrounded by a tall stone retaining wall. Visitors can survey the park and river from the shaded plaza that includes large Pin oaks (Quercus palustris), a simple formal garden, park benches, and a memorial flagpole easily recognizable from the neighborhood streets.
Niles Triangle between 225th and 226th Streets is named for William White Niles (1861-1935). Mr. Niles played an important role in the creation of parks throughout the Bronx as well as this park along the Bronx River Parkway. The paved space is surrounded by a tall stone retaining wall. Visitors can survey the park and river from the shaded plaza that includes large Pin oaks (Quercus palustris), a simple formal garden, park benches, and a memorial flagpole easily recognizable from the neighborhood streets.
227th Street Playground is a favorite place for families. The fenced playground is only 50 feet from the banks of the Bronx River and is subject to seasonal flooding similar to the Olinville Playground.
Riverine wildlife flocks to the Bronx River, even though it flows through urban parks. In this photo you can also see erosion and soil deposition along the pathways. These are parkwide conditions, occurring after heavy rains and flooding. Erosion control measures have been installed throughout the park, but flood conditions are a larger issue which must be addressed in the master plan. Do you recognize this section of the park?
The park's northern river banks are less accessible to park-users. Do you consider these areas safe? Pedestrian street crossings near this area of the park are difficult due to the parkway on-ramp.
This area is at the northernmost area of the master plan project. The photograph shows the dynamic influence of the water carving a channel through the sand and silt deposited along the Bronx River banks. This area is not currently accessible.

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